Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Fun Facts for Thursday, July 24, 2014

Tell An Old Joke Day
Fun Facts for Thursday, July 24, 2014
The 205 day of the year
160 days left to go 



THIS WEEK IS

  • Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) Education & Awareness Week
  • Everybody Deserves A Massage Week
  • National Parenting Gifted Children Week
  • Captive Nations Week
  • National Independent Retailers Week
  • National Zoo Keeper Week



TODAY IS

  • Cousins Day
  • National Drive-Thru Day
  • National Tequila Day
  • Tell An Old Joke Day


ON THIS DATE...


1725: John Newton, author of "Amazing Grace" and other hymns, is born in London. Converted to Christianity while working on a slave ship, he hoped as a Christian to restrain the worst excesses of the slave trade, "promoting the life of God in the soul" of both his crew and his African cargo. In 1764 he became an Anglican minister and each week wrote a hymn to be sung to a familiar tune. In 1787 Newton wrote Thoughts Upon the African Slave Trade to help William Wilberforce's campaign to end the slave trade
1847: At the Great Salt Lake, Brigham Young founded the State of Deseret. The U.S. government later changed the name to Utah.
1866: Tennessee became the first state to be readmitted to the Union after the Civil War.
1874: Oswald Chambers, author of "My Utmost for His Highest" (which was published posthumously in 1927), is born in Aberdeen, Scotland.
1915: The passenger ship S.S. Eastland capsizes while tied to a dock in the Chicago River. A total of 844 passengers and crew are killed in the largest loss of life disaster from a single shipwreck on the Great Lakes.
1941: WRBL in Columbus, Ohio, hired 17-year-old Chet Atkins as a staff guitarist.
1952: High Noon, starring Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly, opened at U.S. movie theaters. The role won Cooper an Academy Award for Best Actor. The title song, sung by Tex Ritter, also won an Oscar. Cooper did the movie for $60,000 plus a percentage of the gross.


1956: After exactly ten years to the day together as the country’s 
most popular comedy team, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis did their final show at the Copacabana in New York City.

1965: Singer Bob Dylan released "Like A Rolling Stone."
1969: The Apollo 11 astronauts, including the first men to set foot on the moon, splashed down safely in the Pacific Ocean.
1974: - The U.S. Supreme Court unanimously ruled that President Richard Nixon had to turn over subpoenaed White House tape recordings to the Watergate special prosecutor.
1979: Evangelist "Little Richard" Penniman warned at a San Francisco revival about the dangers of rock ‘n’ roll.
1983: George Brett batting for the Kansas City Royals against the New York Yankees, has a game-winning home run nullified in the "Pine Tar Incident"
1987: 91-year-old Hulda Crooks became the oldest person ever to climb Japan’s Mt. Fuji. When her team reached the summit, Hulda said, "Hey, dudes -- how do I get down from here?"
1993: 82-year-old Dick McDonald married 81-year-old Grace Sims in Pacific Palisades, California. It was their second marriage—to each other. They had been divorced for 61 years.
1996: The city of Tianjin in northern China approved a fine equal to $150 for couples caught living together without a marriage license. They called it a "sin tax."
1998: A 48-year-old woman told police her dentist stormed into a crowded Wiesbaden, Germany, bar and yanked out her dentures because she failed to pay her dental bill. Police later found the dentures at the dentist’s office.
2001: A teen-age suspect who was apparently under the influence of drugs escaped from authorities in Lewiston, Maine, after biting through the steel chain on his handcuffs. The boy was recaptured and placed in a home for troubled teens.
2002: A fleet of six bicycle ambulances, complete with flashing blue lights, sirens and heart-starting defibrillators, hit the streets of London. The two-wheeled ambulances were sent to emergency calls downtown at the same time as their four-wheel counterparts. Trials revealed the bicycles were likely to arrive first in 88 percent of cases. In a third of calls, the bicycle medic was also able to treat the patient at the scene and cancel the full ambulance response.
2005: Lance Armstrong won his seventh straight Tour de France victory.
2006: Deposed Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein was hospitalized on a forced feeding tube in Baghdad as his massacre trial resumed without him.



HISTORY SPOTLIGHT

Bonneville leads first wagon crossing of South Pass (Taken from Link


Benjamin Bonneville, an inept fur trader who some speculate may have actually been a spy, leads the first wagon train to cross the Rocky Mountains at Wyoming's South Pass.
The motivations for Bonneville's western expeditions have always remained somewhat mysterious. A native of France, Bonneville came to the United States in 1803 at the age of seven. He later graduated from West Point, and he served at frontier posts in Arkansas, Texas, and Indian Territory. According to one view, Bonneville simply observed the rapid growth of the western fur trade at these posts and conceived a bold plan to mount his own fur trading expedition. However, others suggest Bonneville's true goal for the expedition may have been to serve as a Far Western spy for the U.S. government.


QUICK TRIVIA


Many major chains do 60% to 70% of their business at the drive-thru. 
(Taken from Link




WORD OF THE DAY


Incalculable  [in-kal-kyuh-luh-buhl]

adjective
1. very numerous or great.
2. unable to be calculated; beyond calculation.

"Sally began to count the number of stars in the sky, but it became clear to her very quickly, that their number was incalculable" 


INTRIGUING BIBLE FACT 

The story of the rich, young, ruler is found in Matthew, Mark, and Luke. In all 3 gospels he is called rich--or even extremely wealthy. Only Matthew calls him a young man. Only Luke identifies him as a “ruler” which probably meant that he was a leader in the synagogue or he might have been part of the ruling body of the Sanhedrin. 


WORD FROM THE WORD

He counts the number of the stars; He calls them all by name. —Psalm 147:4

Read today's "Our Daily Bread

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Fun Facts for Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Hot Enough For Ya Day? 
Fun Facts for Wednesday, July 23, 2014
The 204 day of the year
161 days left to go 


THIS WEEK IS

  • Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) Education & Awareness Week
  • Everybody Deserves A Massage Week
  • National Parenting Gifted Children Week
  • Captive Nations Week
  • National Independent Retailers Week
  • National Zoo Keeper Week



TODAY IS

  • Gorgeous Grandma Day
  • Hot Enough For Ya Day
  • National Vanilla Ice Cream Day
  • National Hot Dog Day



ON THIS DATE...
1715: The first lighthouse in America was authorized for construction at Little Brewster Island, Massachusetts.
1827: The first swimming school in the U.S. opened in Boston, MA.
1829: In the United States, William Austin Burt patents the typographer, a precursor to the typewriter.
1903: The Ford Motor Company sells its first car.


1950: "The Gene Autry Show" debuted on CBS-TV.  Gene and sidekick Pat Buttram brought the bad guys to justice for six years.

1966: "They’re Coming to Take Me Away Ha-Haaa!" by Napoleon-the-14th entered the Billboard Hot 100. The song reached #3 before most radio stations pulled it because of complaints from mental health organizations. The writer and vocalist, Jerry Samuels, was a former mental patient.
1979: The Ayatollah Khomeini banned non-religious music in Iran.


1982: The Coca-Cola company introduced Diet Coke.


1984: Miss America Vanessa Williams relinquished her crown to first runnerup Suzette Charles. Pageant officials had asked Vanessa to give up the title after nude photos of her were published.
1986: Britain’s Prince Andrew married Sarah Ferguson in Westminster Abbey. The marriage folded in 1992.
1994: Searchers found Tabitha the cat after her owner had filed suit to ground a Tower Air 747 airliner for a 24-hour search. The cat had been lost inside the plane’s cargo hold for 12 days, traveling to New York, Los Angeles, Miami, and San Juan. She was okay, but hungry.
1994: Amy Osmond was crowned America’s Junior Miss. The daughter of singer Wayne Osmond, Amy played Aunt Marie in the TV movie Side By Side.


1997: Josh the Wonder Dog died of cancer at age 16 in Riviera Beach, Maryland. Josh, listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the world’s most petted dog, had been petted 478-thousand times, appearing at hundreds of schools, the 1992 Republican Convention, and as Grand Marshall of the 

1997 Mardi Gras Parade in New Orleans.
2000: Lance Armstrong won his second Tour de France
2006:  Floyd Landis succeeded fellow American Lance Armstrong as winner of the Tour de France, the cycling classic smeared this year by a drug scandal.



HISTORY SPOTLIGHT

Miss America Resigns (Taken from Link


On this day in 1984, 21-year-old Vanessa Williams gives up her Miss America title, the first resignation in the pageant's history, after Penthouse magazine announces plans to publish nude photos of the beauty queen in its September issue. Williams originally made history on September 17, 1983, when she became the first black woman to win the Miss America crown. Miss New Jersey, Suzette Charles, the first runner-up and also an African American, assumed Williams' tiara for the two months that remained of her reign.


QUICK TRIVIA

Ice Cream (Taken from Link


•  The aver­age per­son eats about 22 quarts of ice cream a year.

•  80 percent of the world’s Vanilla Bean used for ice cream is grown in Madagascar.

•  Around 13% of men and 8% of women will admit to licking the bowl clean after eating ice cream.



WORD OF THE DAY

Fructuous
[fruhk-choo-uhs] –adjective 
productive; fertile; profitable

"Billy and Susie didn't want to help mom with the fellowship dinner at the church, when they saw the dessert table, they changed their mind and now viewed their work as a fructuous endeavor"


INTRIGUING BIBLE FACT 

The camels of the Mideanite warriors wore necklaces.

"And he said, "I do have one request, that each of you give me an earring from your share of the plunder." (It was the custom of the Ishmaelites to wear gold earrings.) They answered, "We'll be glad to give them." So they spread out a garment, and each man threw a ring from his plunder onto it.  The weight of the gold rings he asked for came to seventeen hundred shekels, not counting the ornaments, the pendants and the purple garments worn by the kings of Midian or the chains that were on their camels' necks" (Judges 8:24-26). 




WORD FROM THE WORD

Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one! You shall love the Lord your God. —Deuteronomy 6:4-5

Read today's "Our Daily Bread


Monday, July 21, 2014

Fun Facts for Tuesday, July 22, 2014

National Penuche Fudge Day 
Fun Facts for Tuesday, July 22, 2014
The 203 day of the year
162 days left to go 



THIS WEEK IS

  • Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) Education & Awareness Week
  • Everybody Deserves A Massage Week
  • National Parenting Gifted Children Week
  • Captive Nations Week
  • National Independent Retailers Week
  • National Zoo Keeper Week



TODAY IS

  • Casual Pi Day
  • National Penuche Fudge Day
  • Rat-catchers Day
  • Spooners (Spoonerism) Day



ON THIS DATE...
1376: The legend of the Pied Piper of Hamelin leading rats out of town is said to have occurred on this date. 
1587: A second English colony, also ill-fated, was established on Roanoke Island off North Carolina.
1793: Sir Alexander Mackenzie arrived at Canada's Pacific coast.
1796: Cleveland, Ohio, was founded by General Moses Cleveland.
1894: The first automobile race took place between Paris and Rouen, France.


1926: Babe Ruth proved that he could catch a baseball. In a stunt at Mitchell Field in New York, Ruth, a private in the National Guard, caught a baseball that was dropped from an airplane. The plane was at 250 feet and traveling at about 100 miles-per-hour.


1933: American aviator Wiley Post completed the first solo flight around the world in 7 days, 18 hours, and 49 minutes.
1934: Notorious criminal John Dillinger, America's "Public Enemy No. 1," was shot and killed outside a Chicago theater by federal agents.
1940: Thomas Wayne Perkins was born. He and Elvis attended the same high school in Memphis. His brother Luther played guitar for Johnny Cash. In 1959 Thomas Wayne had one hit record: "Tragedy." He died in 1971 at age 31.
1963: Vee-Jay Records released an album entitled Introducing the Beatles.
1976: General Robert E. Lee became a U.S. citizen. The paper work had been bogged down for 110 years.
1985: Cleveland fans gobbled up 70,000 tickets in less than three hours to see Bruce Springsteen in concert.
1989: At 10:00 a.m. John Nowbilski and Don Gliha completed their 536th hole of golf in 24 hours at Tallwood Country Club in Manchester, Connecticut. They averaged 2 minutes 40 seconds per hole.
1992: Bandits apparently spent all night cutting through a wall of a Lloyds Bank in Hampshire, England, only to find the building was empty. The bank had been closed for four years.


1993: Actress Michelle Pfeiffer became the world's top paid actress when she accepted the offer of $12 million to play Catwoman in a spin-off movie about Batman's evil opponent.


1995: Singer Shania Twain had her first #1 hit as "Any Man of Mine" topped the Billboard country music chart.
2001: A 30-year-old New Dehli man won a place in the Limca Book of Records, the equivalent of the Guinness Book of Record for India, by standing still for 24 hours and one minute. The previous records was 18 hours.
2001: A 27-year-old South African burglar was arrested after he broke into a library where the local policeman was discussing crime statistics. Carrying boxes and computer disks, the suspect was grabbed by security staff while the officer was discussing crime statistics.



HISTORY SPOTLIGHT

Public Enemy No. 1 John Dillinger gunned down (Taken from Link


Outside Chicago's Biograph Theatre, notorious criminal John Dillinger--America's "Public Enemy No. 1"--is killed in a hail of bullets fired by federal agents. In a fiery bank-robbing career that lasted just over a year, Dillinger and his associates robbed 11 banks for more than $300,000, broke jail and narrowly escaped capture multiple times, and killed seven police officers and three federal agents.


QUICK TRIVIA

The Pied Piper (Taken from Link)


The Pied Piper of Hameln (German: Rattenfänger von Hameln) is the subject of a legend concerning the departure or death of a great number of children from the town of Hamelin (Hameln), Lower Saxony, Germany, in the Middle Ages. The earliest references describe a piper, dressed in multicolored clothing, leading the children away from the town never to return. In the 16th century the story was expanded into a full narrative, in which the piper is a rat-catcher hired by the town to lure rats away with his magic pipe. When the citizenry refuses to pay for this service, he retaliates by turning his magic on their children, leading them away as he had the rats. This version of the story spread as a fairy tale. 



WORD OF THE DAY


 Raconteur 
\rack-on-TUR\ , noun: 
One who excels in telling stories and anecdotes. 
"Jesus' stories were always entertaining, compelling, and instructive. Needless to say, he was a raconteur, bar none"



INTRIGUING BIBLE FACT 

The prophet Agabus predicted that Paul would be captured in Jerusalem

"After we had been there a number of days, a prophet named Agabus came down from Judea. Coming over to us, he took Paul's belt, tied his own hands and feet with it and said, "The Holy Spirit says, 'In this way the Jews of Jerusalem will bind the owner of this belt and will hand him over to the Gentiles.' " When we heard this, we and the people there pleaded with Paul not to go up to Jerusalem. Then Paul answered, "Why are you weeping and breaking my heart? I am ready not only to be bound, but also to die in Jerusalem for the name of the Lord Jesus." When he would not be dissuaded, we gave up and said, "The Lord's will be done"  (Acts 21:10-14).



WORD FROM THE WORD

When I kept silent, my bones grew old through my groaning all the day long. —Psalm 32:3

Read today's "Our Daily Bread