Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Fun Facts for Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Happy National Picnic Day! 

Fun Facts for Wednesday, April 23, 2014
The 113 day of the year
252 days left to go 



THIS WEEK IS

  • National Park Week
  • Administrative Professionals Week
  • Animal Cruelty/Human Violence Awareness Week
  • Bedbug Awareness Week
  • Coin Week
  • International Whistlers Week
  • National Infertility Awareness Week
  • National Karaoke Week
  • National Princess Week
  • National Pet ID Week
  • Medical Laboratory Professionals Week
  • National Playground Safety Week
  • National Work Zone Safety Awareness Week
  • Safe Kids Week



TODAY IS

  • English Language Day
  • Impossible Astronaut Day
  • National Lost Dog Awareness Day
  • Movie Theatre Day
  • Talk Like Shakespeare Day
  • World Book & Copyright Day
  • World Book Night
  • Administrative Professionals Day or Secretary's Day
  • National Cherry Cheesecake Day
  • National Picnic Day



ON THIS DATE...
1348: English King Edward III founded the Order of the Garter, the first order of knighthood.
1616: dramatist, playwright William Shakespeare died at the age of 52. 
1635:  The Boston Latin School opened -- America's oldest public school.
1789:  President-elect George Washington and his wife moved into the first executive mansion, the Franklin House, in New York.
1900: the word, "hillbilly," was first used in print in a "New York Journal" article. The article defined "hillbilly" as a quote, "free and untrampled white citizen of Alabama who lived in the hills." It went on to say quote, "he has no means to speak of, dresses as he pleases, drinks whiskey when he gets it and fires off his revolver as the fancy takes him." 
1914: First baseball game at Wrigley Field, then known as Weeghman Park in Chicago.
1948: Johnny Longden became the first jockey to ride three-thousand career winners. 
1950: Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz announced the creation of Desilu Productions. 
1951: The Associated Press began use of its new Teletypesetter circuit. The AP provided a perforated, paper-tape message to a news bureau in Charlotte, North Carolina. The message was then fed to a monitor for preparation into a printer. From there, the newspaper copy was completed.
1954: Hank Aaron of the Milwaukee Braves hit his first major league home run off Vic Raschi of the St. Louis Cardinals. 
1956: the United States Supreme Court put an end to racial segregation on buses. 
1963: Pete Rose of the Cincinnati Reds got his first major league hit off Bob Friend of the Pittsburgh Pirates. 
1964: Ken Johnson of the Houston Colts became the first pitcher to throw a no-hitter and lose the game.  The Cincinnati Reds won the game, one-to-nothing.  The team scored its run on two errors. 
1968: The Methodist Church and the Evangelical United Brethren Church merged to form the United Methodist Church.
1969: Sirhan Sirhan was sentenced to death for the assassination of Senator Robert F. Kennedy. The sentence was later commuted to life in prison. 
1985: the Coca Cola Company announced it was changing the 99-year-old secret formula for the world's best-selling soft drink.  The move turned out to be an unpopular with classic Coke fans and the company soon changed its mind and brought back the original version. 
1987: "Business Week" magazine listed Chrysler's Lee Iacocca as highest paid executive at more than 20-million dollars per year. 
1988: A federal ban on smoking during domestic airline flights of two hours or less went into effect.
1993: United Farm Workers of America and National Farm Workers Association president Cesar Chavez died at the age of 66. 
1992: McDonald's opened its first fast-food restaurant in the Chinese capital of Beijing. 
1995: Hall-of-Fame sportscaster Howard Cosell died at the age of 77. He helped turn "Monday Night Football" into a national institution. 
1995: President Clinton declared a national day of mourning for Oklahoma City in the wake of the bombing that claimed dozens of lives. 
1997: Doctors at the University of Southern California announced that a child was born in late 1996 to a 63-year-old woman on hormone therapy. 
2007: former Russian President Boris Yeltsin died at the age of 76.  Yeltsin who presided over the demise of the Soviet Union and Russia's transition to a free market, ruled Russia from 1991 to the last day of 1999 when he handed over power to Vladimir Putin.   
2009: for the first time in his 17-year history with "The Tonight Show," host Jay Leno called in sick.  Leno was admitted to a hospital with an undisclosed illness.  He was released one day later.  NBC aired a repeat segment of "The Tonight Show" in light of Leno's illness.  
2010: Arizona Governor Jan Brewer signed the controversial immigration bill into law.  The bill aimed to prosecute and deport illegal immigrants and gave police broad power to detain anyone suspected of being in the country illegally.  Critics, including President Obama, said the bill gave license to harass and discriminate against immigrants.  
2013: the U.S. Justice Department filed suit against disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong over his use of banned substances.  



HISTORY SPOTLIGHT
Leave my Cola-Cola alone (Taken from Link

On this day in 1985, The Coca-Cola Company took arguably the biggest risk in consumer goods history, announcing that it was changing the formula for the world's most popular soft drink, and spawning consumer angst the likes of which no business has ever seen.
The Coca-Cola Company introduced reformulated Coca-Cola, often referred to as "new Coke," marking the first formula change in 99 years. The company didn't set out to create the firestorm of consumer protest that ensued; instead, The Coca-Cola Company intended to re-energize its Coca-Cola brand and the cola category in its largest market, the United States.
That firestorm ended with the return of the original formula, now called Coca-Cola classic, a few months later. The return of original formula Coca-Cola on July 11, 1985, put the cap on 79 days that revolutionized the soft-drink industry, transformed The Coca-Cola Company and stands today as testimony to the power of taking intelligent risks, even when they don't quite work as intended.


QUICK TRIVIA 

Administrative Professionals' Day (also known as Secretaries Day or Admin Day) is an unofficial holiday designed to recognize the work of secretaries, administrative assistants, receptionists, and other administrative support professionals. In the U.S., it is celebrated on the Wednesday of the last full week in April. 



WORD OF THE DAY 

lull 
[luhl] Verb--used with an object

to put to sleep or rest by soothing means
to soothe or quiet

"The loving mother attempted to lull the child to sleep by singing a lullaby"



INTRIGUING BIBLE FACT

The Bible says that Enoch walked with God--and God took him

When Enoch had lived 65 years, he became the father of Methuselah. And after he became the father of Methuselah, Enoch walked with God 300 years and had other sons and daughters. Altogether, Enoch lived 365 years. Enoch walked with God; then he was no more, because God took him away. (Gen. 5:21-24)



WORD FROM THE WORD 

O Death, where is your sting? —1 Corinthians 15:55

Read today's "Our Daily Bread

Monday, April 21, 2014

Fun Facts for Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Fun Facts for Tuesday, April 22, 2014
The 112 day of the year
253 days left to go 



THIS WEEK IS

  • National Park Week
  • Administrative Professionals Week
  • Animal Cruelty/Human Violence Awareness Week
  • Bedbug Awareness Week
  • Coin Week
  • International Whistlers Week
  • National Infertility Awareness Week
  • National Karaoke Week
  • National Princess Week
  • National Pet ID Week
  • Medical Laboratory Professionals Week
  • National Playground Safety Week
  • National Work Zone Safety Awareness Week
  • Safe Kids Week




TODAY IS

  • Earth Day
  • Girl Scout Leaders Day
  • "In God We Trust Day" Day
  • Mother Earth Day
  • National Jelly Bean Day



ON THIS DATE...

1838: The first steamship to cross the Atlantic, the British ship Sirius, arrived at New York; it made the crossing in 18 days.
1864: Congress issued a mandate calling for all U.S. minted coins to bear the inscription "In God We Trust." 
1889:  At noon, the sound of a gun shot was the only signal needed for thousands of settlers to rush into the Oklahoma territory to claim their pieces of land. The U.S. Federal government had purchased almost two million acres of land in Central Oklahoma from the Crete and Seminole Indians and opened it up on this day to the settlers to claim their stakes
1898: the Spanish-American War began when the U.S.S. Nashville captured a Spanish merchant ship off Key West, Florida. 
1914 - Babe Ruth made his professional pitching debut, playing for the Baltimore Orioles.
1915: the New York Yankees wore their famous pinstriped uniforms for the first time. 
1915: German forces in World War One became the first modern army to use chemical weapons when they used poison gas on the Western Front. 
1931: an autogyro landed on the lawn of the White House.  President Herbert Hoover presented the pilot with a trophy. 
1940: the first all-Chinese commercial radio program was broadcast by KSAN in San Francisco, California. 
1954: the televised Senate Army-McCarthy hearings began. 
1956: Elvis Presley made his Las Vegas debut at the New Frontier Hotel.  The hotel management was so unimpressed they cancelled his engagement after only one week. 
1964: President Johnson opened the New York World's Fair. 
1969: The Who performed "Tommy" for the first time in public in Dolton, England. 
1970: Ross Perot of Dallas, Texas, lost 450-million dollars on the stock market. 
1970: Americans observed the first ever "Earth Day." 
1976: Barbara Walters became the first female nightly news anchor when she teamed with Harry Reasoner to co-host the "ABC Evening News." 
1978: reggae star Bob Marley and his band the Wailers performed at the One Love Peace Concert near Kingston, Jamaica.  Marley united Prime Minister Michael Manley and his opponent Edward Seaga on stage.  It was Marley's first concert appearance in Jamaica since he was injured in an assassination attempt 1976. 
1993: the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum was dedicated in Washington, D.C., to honor the victims of Nazi extermination. 
1994: former President Richard Nixon died at a New York hospital, four days after suffering a stroke. He was 81. 
1994: Michael Moorer became the first left-handed heavyweight boxing champion in history when he outpointed Evander Holyfield for the I-B-F and W-B-A titles. 
1996: humorist Erma Bombeck died at the age of 69. 
2000:  in a dramatic pre-dawn raid, armed immigration agents seized Elian Gonzalez from his relatives' home in Miami.  The six-year-old Cuban boy at the center of an international custody battle was reunited with his father at Andrews Air Force Base near Washington. 
2004: former NFL player Pat Tillman, who walked away from a multimillion dollar contract with the Arizona Cardinals 2002 to join the Army's elite Rangers, was killed in action in southeastern Afghanistan where his unit was hunting al-Qaeda and Taliban guerrillas.  Tillman was 27 years old.    
2005: putting an end to a bizarre weeks-long investigation that captured national headlines, police announced the arrest of a woman who claimed she found a fingertip in a bowl of chili at a Wendy's fast food restaurant.  Anna Ayala was charged with attempted grand larceny.  Police said Wendy's was the true victim in the case.  
2008: First Lady Laura Bush sat in as a guest co-host on NBC's "Today" show, making her the first First Lady to do so.  
2011: a judge ordered actress Lindsay Lohan to serve 120 days in jail for violating the terms of her probation after Lohan was charged in connection to the theft of an expensive necklace from a boutique store in Venice, California.  Lohan spent a few hours at a correctional facility before posting bond and filing an appeal against the judge's order. 
2011: a tornado ripped through St. Louis, Missouri flattening businesses and homes.  The storm, called the most powerful in the region since 1967: also damaged the main concourse at St. Louis International Airport. 
2013: the city of Boston led the nation in a moment of silence in observation of the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings that occurred a week earlier.




HISTORY SPOTLIGHT
In God We Trust (Taken from Link)

In December 1863, the Director of the Mint submitted designs for new one-cent coin, two-cent coin, and three-cent coin to Secretary Chase for approval. He proposed that upon the designs either OUR COUNTRY; OUR GOD or GOD, OUR TRUST should appear as a motto on the coins.
In a letter to the Mint Director on December 9, 1863, Secretary Chase stated: I approve your mottoes, only suggesting that on that with the Washington obverse the motto should begin with the word OUR, so as to read OUR GOD AND OUR COUNTRY. And on that with the shield, it should be changed so as to read: IN GOD WE TRUST. 
The Congress passed the Act of April 22, 1864. This legislation changed the composition of the one-cent coin and authorized the minting of the two-cent coin. The Mint Director was directed to develop the designs for these coins for final approval of the Secretary. IN GOD WE TRUST first appeared on the 1864 two-cent coin.



QUICK TRIVIA 

Jelly Bean Fun (Taken from Link)

The first jelly bean was created by an unknown American candy maker in the 1800s. An 1861 advertisement recommended sending jelly beans to soldiers fighting in the Civil War.
It takes 7 to 21 days to make a single Jelly Belly jelly bean.
Very Cherry remained the most popular flavor of Jelly Belly beans for two decades until 1998, when Buttered Popcorn moved into first place. In 2003 Very Cherry moved back into top position by a mere 8 million beans.
Enough Jelly Belly beans were eaten in the last year to circle the earth more than five times.



WORD OF THE DAY 

bibelot  [bib-loh]   noun, plural bibelots 
a small object of curiosity, beauty, or rarity

"Digging in her mom's jewelry box, Maggie was fascinated by the bibelots" 



INTRIGUING BIBLE FACT

The prophet Jeremiah was told to buy a linen belt--but not to allow it to get wet

This is what the Lord said to me: “Go and buy a linen belt and put it around your waist, but do not let it touch water.” (Jeremiah 13:1)


WORD FROM THE WORD 

By the name of Jesus . . . , whom you crucified, whom God raised from the dead, by Him this man stands here before you whole. —Acts 4:10

Read today's "Our Daily Bread

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Fun Facts for Monday, April 21, 2014

Bulldogs are Beautiful Day! 
Fun Facts for Monday, April 21, 2014
The 111 day of the year
254 days left to go 


THIS WEEK IS

  • National Park Week
  • Administrative Professionals Week
  • Animal Cruelty/Human Violence Awareness Week
  • Bedbug Awareness Week
  • Coin Week
  • International Whistlers Week
  • National Infertility Awareness Week
  • National Karaoke Week
  • National Princess Week
  • National Pet ID Week
  • Medical Laboratory Professionals Week
  • National Playground Safety Week
  • National Work Zone Safety Awareness Week
  • Safe Kids Week




TODAY IS

  • Boston Marathon
  • Bulldogs are Beautiful Day
  • Dyngus Day
  • Kindergarten Day
  • National Chocolate-covered Cashews Day
  • National Surprise Drug Test Day
  • Chocolate-Covered Cashew Truffle Day
  • (In case you missed it, yesterday was "Lima Bean Respect Day")



ON THIS DATE...
753 BC: Romulus founds Rome (traditional date).
1509: Henry VIII became King of England.
1856: The first rail train to pass over the mighty Mississippi River between Davenport, Iowa and Rock Island, IL made its journey across a newly completed bridge between the two rail centers.
1910: novelist Mark Twain died at the age of 79. Born Samuel Langhorne Clemens, he penned several American classics including "Huckleberry Finn" and "Tom Sawyer." 
1918: Manfred Von Ricthoven, the German aviator known as The Red Baron, died at the age of 25. He was shot down in action during World War One after shooting down 80 enemy planes. 
1934: The "Surgeon's Photograph", the most famous photo allegedly showing the Loch Ness Monster, is published in the Daily Mail (in 1999, it is revealed to be a hoax).
1940: The quiz show "Take It or Leave It, " premiered on radio; this was the show that asked the "$64 Question."
1945: the cartoon character Yosemite Sam debuted in "Hare Trigger" by Warner Brothers. 
1949: Groucho Marx became the first comedian to win the George Foster Peabody Award. 
1956: ten-year-old Leonard Ross became the youngest prize-winner on a big time game show by winning 100-thousand dollars on "The Big Surprise." 
1959: Alfred Dean set a record when he reeled in a 16-foot, ten-inch, white shark off the coast of Ceduna, South Australia. The shark weighed nearly 27-hundred pounds. 
1962: The Seattle World's Fair (Century 21 Exposition) opens. It is the first World's Fair in the United States since World War II.
1963: The Beatles and The Rolling Stones met for the first time at the Crawdaddy Club in Richmond, England. The Stones opened the show. 
1970: sportscaster Curt Gowdy won the George Foster Peabody Award. 
1970: Bob Cousy and Bob Petit were inducted into the Basketball Hall-of-Fame. 
1977: "Annie" opened at the Alvin Theatre in New York City. 
1982: Dr. Michael E. DeBakey performed the first successful heart implant in Houston, Texas. 
1984: Michael Jackson's album "Thriller" ended its record run atop the charts when it slipped to number three. It had been on top for 37 weeks in a row. 
1986: The once-notorious Lexington Hotel in Chicago received a visitor, in the person of Geraldo Rivera, along with a camera crew. A record audience watched as the long-sealed vault of racketeer, Al Capone was opened during a much-hyped TV special. Guess what? All that Geraldo found were broken bottles and no trace that Capone and his gang had ever stashed anything there
1995: Timothy McVeigh was arrested and charged with bombing the Oklahoma City federal building two days earlier. 
1997: the ashes of 1960's LSD guru Timothy Leary and "Star Trek" creator Gene Roddenberry were blasted into space aboard a Spanish satellite. 
2012: Watergate felon turned Evangelical leader Charles Colson died on this date at the age of 80.  Colson spent seven months in jail after pleading guilty to obstruction of justice in connection with the Watergate scandal. 
2013: Oscar winner Reese Witherspoon publicly apologized for actions that led to a disorderly conduct charge in Atlanta two days earlier.  Her husband and agent Jim Toth was arrested for DUI. 



HISTORY SPOTLIGHT

Surgeon's Photograph (Taken from Link

The most famous picture of the Loch Ness Monster, a grainy black and white photograph showing a long head and neck emerging from the lake, was taken on this day in 1934. It was later proven to be a hoax.

In 1993, Christian Spurling, stepson of the flamboyant movie maker and big game hunter "Duke" Wetherell, admitted he'd made the "monster" out of some plastic and a clockwork, tinplate, toy submarine. The picture (Often referred to as the "Surgeon's Photograph," because Colonel Robert Kenneth Wilson, a physician, claimed to had taken it by the Loch in April of 1934) had withstood careful scientific examination. Monster fans had speculated that the pictures showed a plesiosaur, while skeptics said it must have been an otter head or tree trunk. Nobody seems to have suspected it was actually a toy submarine.


QUICK TRIVIA 

Yosemite Sam (Taken from Link

Animator Friz Freleng introduced Yosemite Sam in the 1945 cartoon Hare Trigger. The name is somewhat alliterative and is inspired by Yosemite National Park. He is commonly depicted as an extremely grouchy gunslinging prospector, outlaw, pirate, or cowboy with a hair-trigger temper and an intense hatred of rabbits, Bugs particularly. During the Golden Age of American animation, Yosemite Sam appeared in 33 shorts.



WORD OF THE DAY 

happenstance  [hap-uhn-stans]

noun

a chance happening or event.

"Staring into the eyes of the lady in the red dress, Harry couldn't determine if the event was providence or mere happenstance"



INTRIGUING BIBLE FACT

Moses wins the “most humble” award. 

“Now Moses was a very humble man, more humble than anyone else on the face of the earth” (Num 12:3).



WORD FROM THE WORD 

The hour is coming in which all who are in the graves will hear His voice and come forth. —John 5:28-29

Read today's "Our Daily Bread