Thursday, April 17, 2014

Fun Facts for Thursday, April 17, 2014

Fun Facts for Thursday, April 17, 2014
The 107 day of the year
258 days left to go 



THIS WEEK IS

  • Animal Control Officer Appreciation Week
  • National Animal Control Appreciation Week
  • National Environmental Education Week
  • National Library Week
  • National Public Safety Telecommunicators (911 Operators) Week
  • National Student Employment Week
  • Pan American Week
  • Undergraduate Research Week
  • Health Information Privacy and Security Week




TODAY IS

  • Bat Appreciation Day
  • Blah! Blah! Blah! Day
  • Ellis Island Family History Day
  • Ford Mustang Day
  • Get to Know Your Customers Day
  • High Five Day
  • National Haiku Poetry Day
  • Nothing Like A Dame Day
  • Poem In Your Pocket Day
  • Support Teen Literature Day
  • National Cheeseball Day
  • Healthy Kids Day




ON THIS DATE...

1194: Richard the Lionhearted returned to England and was crowned for the second time after his epic journey and victory in the Third Crusade.
1492: Christopher Columbus and a representative of Spain's King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella signed a contract, giving Columbus a commission to seek a western route to the Indies.
1524: Giovanni da Verrazano discovered New York Harbor.
1629:  Horses were first imported into the colonies by the Massachusetts Bay Colony.
1790: legendary American statesman Benjamin Franklin died at the age of 84. 
1810: Pineapple cheese was patented by Lewis M. Norton. Mr. Norton lived nowhere near pineapples. He was from Troy, PA
1860: it became law in New York City that tenement houses be equipped with fire escapes.
1861: Virginia voted to secede from the Union, the 8th state to do so.
1875: The game "snooker" was invented by Sir Neville Chamberlain.
1935: People gathered around the radio to listen for the first time to what would become the ultimate horror show on NBC Radio. Lights Out remained on radio until 1946.
1941: Igor Sikorsky made the first successful flight in an amphibious helicopter. 
1946: Syria declared independence from French administration. 
1953: New York Yankees legend Mickey Mantle hit a 565-foot home run at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C.  It is the longest home run ever recorded.  The ball was found a block away from the stadium. 
1961: The Bay of Pigs invasion begins
1964: Ford Motor Company unveiled the Mustang.
1967: "The Joey Bishop Show" debuted on ABC Television. The show was designed to challenge NBC's "Tonight Show."  It went off the air two years later. 
1969: Sirhan Sirhan was convicted of assassinating Senator Robert F. Kennedy.  He was originally sentenced to death, but the sentence was reduced to life in prison after California abolished the death penalty. 
1970: The astronauts of Apollo 13 splashed down safely in the Pacific, after four days in a crippled spacecraft.
1970: Paul McCartney released his first solo album "McCartney." The release signified the end of The Beatles. 
1971:  Joy to the World, by Three Dog Night, made it to the top of the pop music charts on this day. The song was number one for six weeks
1985: the United States Postal Service unveiled it's "LOVE" stamp. 
1985: "Days of our Lives" fans lined up in Hollywood, California, to get tickets to watch characters Bo and Hope get married.  It was the first soap opera wedding open to fans. 
1987: Julius Erving of the Philadelphia 76ers became the third NBA player to score 30:000 points in a career.  Erving scored 38 points to join Wilt Chamberlain and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar in the elite category.  
1993: a federal grand jury in Los Angeles convicted two former police officers, Stacey Koon and Laurence Powell of violating the civil rights of beaten motorist Rodney King.  Two other officers were acquitted. 
1993: officials at Magic Mountain in Santa Clarita, California, announced they would not hold any more rap concerts at the amusement park after several hundred youths went on a rampage when they couldn't get into a sold-out show featuring TLC and Paperboy. 
1997: Martin Brodeur of the New Jersey Devils became only the second goaltender to score a goal in a playoff game. 
2001: Mississippi residents voted to keep the Confederate emblem on their state flag. 
2001: San Francisco Giants slugger Barry Bonds hit his 500th home run in a game against the Los Angeles Dodgers.  Bonds became the 17th player to reach 500. 
2006: former Illinois Governor George Ryan was found guilty on all charges in his federal corruption trial in Chicago.  A onetime Nobel Prize nominee, Ryan received international attention 2003 when he commuted the death row sentences of 167 Illinois prisoners. 
2013: a funeral for former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher was held at St. Paul's Cathedral in London on this date. 
2013: an explosion at a fertilizer plant north of Waco, Texas resulted in a number of fatalities and injuries.  



HISTORY SPOTLIGHT

The Ford Mustang (Taken from Link)

One of the world's most popular cars was introduced to the public on April 17, 1964, at the New York's World Fair. The night before, the new Ford Mustang was the pace car at a stock car race in my hometown--Huntsville, Alabama. The car appeared on the covers of Time and Newsweek.

Advertisements appeared in more than 2,600 newspapers and on the major television networks. More than four million people visited showrooms, and more than 22,000 cars were ordered on the first day. First-year sales totaled more than 417,000, shattering previous sales records of any one model in the history of the automobile.

The Mustang was selected to pace the Indianapolis 500 in 1964



QUICK TRIVIA 

In 1801, the town of Cheshire, Mass., sent a 1,000-pound cheese ball to the White House as a gift for new President Thomas Jefferson.
Not the actual cheeseball--or even a replica.
It's just a normal cheeseball. 



WORD OF THE DAY 

enigma [uh-nig-muh] –noun,

1. a puzzling or inexplicable occurrence or situation:
2. a person of puzzling or contradictory character: 
3. a saying, question, picture, etc., containing a hidden meaning; riddle

"Joey thought that it was an enigma donuts were so light and airy and yet contained many calories" 



INTRIGUING BIBLE FACT

The Apostle Paul was not one to brag on himself--unless he was forced to do so as he was when he wrote his second letter to the church at Corinth. There were some who were questioning his apostleship and attempting to tarnish his name. (His bragging--much different than ours)

"I repeat: Let no one take me for a fool. But if you do, then tolerate me just as you would a fool, so that I may do a little boasting. 17 In this self-confident boasting I am not talking as the Lord would, but as a fool. 18 Since many are boasting in the way the world does, I too will boast. 19 You gladly put up with fools since you are so wise! 20 In fact, you even put up with anyone who enslaves you or exploits you or takes advantage of you or puts on airs or slaps you in the face. 21 To my shame I admit that we were too weak for that! Whatever anyone else dares to boast about—I am speaking as a fool—I also dare to boast about. 22 Are they Hebrews? So am I. Are they Israelites? So am I. Are they Abraham’s descendants? So am I. 23 Are they servants of Christ? (I am out of my mind to talk like this.) I am more. I have worked much harder, been in prison more frequently, been flogged more severely, and been exposed to death again and again. 24 Five times I received from the Jews the forty lashes minus one. 25 Three times I was beaten with rods, once I was pelted with stones, three times I was shipwrecked, I spent a night and a day in the open sea, 26 I have been constantly on the move. I have been in danger from rivers, in danger from bandits, in danger from my fellow Jews, in danger from Gentiles; in danger in the city, in danger in the country, in danger at sea; and in danger from false believers. 27 I have labored and toiled and have often gone without sleep; I have known hunger and thirst and have often gone without food; I have been cold and naked. 28 Besides everything else, I face daily the pressure of my concern for all the churches. 29 Who is weak, and I do not feel weak? Who is led into sin, and I do not inwardly burn?" (1 Cor 11:16-29)



WORD FROM THE WORD 

Pharaoh said to Joseph, “Inasmuch as God has shown you all this, there is no one as discerning and wise as you.” —Genesis 41:39

Read today's "Our Daily Bread

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Fun Facts for Wednesday, April 16, 2014

So, a win-win for everyone, right?

Fun Facts for Wednesday, April 16, 2014
The 106 day of the year
259 days left to go 



THIS WEEK IS

  • Animal Control Officer Appreciation Week
  • National Animal Control Appreciation Week
  • National Environmental Education Week
  • National Library Week
  • National Public Safety Telecommunicators (911 Operators) Week
  • National Student Employment Week
  • Pan American Week
  • Undergraduate Research Week
  • Health Information Privacy and Security Week




TODAY IS

  • National Bookmobile Day
  • National Health Care Decisions Day
  • National Stress Awareness Day
  • National Wear Your Pajamas To Work Day
  • Save The Elephant Day
  • Day of the Mushroom




ON THIS DATE...

1851: A lighthouse was swept away in a gale at Minot's Ledge, Massachusetts.
1862: President Abraham Lincoln signed into law, a bill ending slavery in the District of Columbia. 
1900: the first book of postage stamps was issued. The two-cent stamps were available in books of 12: 24: and 48 stamps. 
1905: Andrew Carnegie donated ten-million dollars to set up the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 
1926: The Book-of-the-Month Club in New York City chose as its first selection, "Lolly Willowes" or "The Loving Huntsman" by Sylvia Townsend.
1935: "Fibber McGee and Molly" debuted on the NBC Blue Radio Network. 
1940: Cleveland Indians pitcher Bob Feller pitched the first no-hit, no-run game ever on opening day of the baseball season. The Indians beat the Chicago White Sox one-to-nothing. 
1947: NBC Television demonstrated the Zoomar camera lens. The device enabled cameras to feature close-up and long distance shots from a stationary camera. 
1962: Walter Cronkite succeeded Douglas Edwards as anchorman of "The CBS Evening News." Cronkite would go on to become known as "the most trusted man in America" during his 18-plus years as anchor. 
1973: former Beatle Paul McCartney starred in his first television special. The program titled "James Paul McCartney" featured the singer's new band, with wife Linda on background vocals. 
1980: Arthur Ashe retired from professional tennis. 
1987: the Federal Communications Commission issued a stern warning to radio stations around the United States to watch the use of indecent language on the air. 
1990: Neil Young, the Neville Brothers, Tracy Chapman, Bonnie Raitt were among the artists who participated in a concert a London's Wembly Stadium celebrating the release Nelson Mandela's release from prison in South Africa. 
1991: English director David Lean died at the age of 83.  He created several Hollywood epics including "The Bridge on the River Kwai" and "Lawrence of Arabia." 
1994: singer, songwriter Harry Connick, Jr., married model Jill Goodacre. 
1994: "Invisible Man" author Ralph Waldo Ellison died on this date at the age of 80.  
1996: Britain's Prince Andrew and his wife, Sarah, the Duchess of York, announced they were in the process of getting a divorce. 
1996: the Chicago Bulls won their 70th game of the season, breaking the record of 69 held by the 1971-1972 Los Angeles Lakers. 
1998: Los Angeles prosecutors filed criminal charges against pop singer George Michael in connection with his arrest a week earlier in a Beverly Hills park restroom.  Michael was charged with one misdemeanor count of engaging in a lewd act. 
1999: "The Great One," Wayne Gretzky announced his retirement after 21 seasons of playing professional hockey.  His last game with the New York Rangers was April 18.  Gretzky held or shared 61 National Hockey League records and his claim to fame was leading the Edmonton Oilers to four Stanley Cup championships. 
1999: a U-W postage stamp was dedicated in honor of Daffy Duck. Hollywood celebrated "Daffy Duck Day." 
1999: Shania Twain became the first woman to be honored as songwriter/artist of the year by the Nashville Songwriters Association International during the 32nd Annual Songwriter Achievement Awards in Nashville. 
2001: the trivia game show "The Weakest Link" premiered on NBC with Anne Robinson as host.  
2001: Israel launched an air strike against a strategic Syrian radar station in Lebanon, killing three Syrian soldiers. 
2001: Sammy Sosa hit his 400th career home run to become the 33rd major leaguer to reach 400 career homers.  The milestone homerun came when Sosa hit a two-run drive for the Chicago Cubs in the fourth inning.  With the home run, Sosa passed Detroit Tigers' Hall of Famer Al Kaline on the all-time homer list. 
2007: in what was described as the worst shooting on a college campus in U.S. history, a gunman opened fire on students and instructors at two locations on the Virginia Tech University campus in Blacksburg, Virginia, killing 32 people before turning the gun on himself.  The gunman was later identified as 23-year-old Cho Seung-Hui.  
2009: the New York Yankees played their first official game at the new Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, New York.  Kelly Clarkson sang the National Anthem and Hall-of-Fame catcher Yogi Berra threw out the game's ceremonial first pitch before the Yanks began the first of a four-game set against the Cleveland Indians. 
2010: pop star Lady Gaga broke a YouTube record for the most views on the video-sharing website after logging more than one billion views. 



HISTORY SPOTLIGHT

Massacre at Virginia Tech (Taken from Link

On this day in 2007, in one of the deadliest shootings in U.S. history, 32 students and teachers die after being gunned down on the campus of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University by Seung Hui Cho, a student at the school who later dies from a self-inflicted gunshot wound. 



QUICK TRIVIA 

National Wear Your Pajamas to Work Day is always the day after taxes are due in the United States. (Link)




WORD OF THE DAY 

Impetus 
[im-pi-tuhs] –noun, plural -tus⋅es. 
1. a moving force; impulse; stimulus
2. (broadly) the momentum of a moving body, esp. with reference to the cause of motion. 

"The impetus for the great revivals in America has been a return to prayer" 



INTRIGUING BIBLE FACT

The Bible contains many practical commands: For example, the Bible reminds us to be careful about meddling in other people's matters. 
Proverbs 26:17, "Like one who seizes a dog by the ears is a passer-by who meddles in a quarrel not his own." 



WORD FROM THE WORD 

You are all sons of God through faith in Christ Jesus. —Galatians 3:26

Read today's "Our Daily Bread

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Fun Facts for Tuesday, April 15, 2014


Fun Facts for Tuesday, April 15, 2014
The 105 day of the year
260 days left to go 



THIS WEEK IS

  • Animal Control Officer Appreciation Week
  • National Animal Control Appreciation Week
  • National Environmental Education Week
  • National Library Week
  • National Public Safety Telecommunicators (911 Operators) Week
  • National Student Employment Week
  • Pan American Week
  • Undergraduate Research Week
  • Health Information Privacy and Security Week




TODAY IS

  • Bicycle Day
  • Income Tax Pay Day
  • Jackie Robinson Day
  • McDonald's Day
  • Rubber Eraser Day
  • Take a Wild Guess Day
  • That Sucks Day
  • World Art Day (DaVinci's Birthday)  
  • National Library Workers Day
  • Glazed Spiral Ham Day




ON THIS DATE...

1770: Joseph Priestley discovered that a piece of rubber could erase pencil lead.  He soon coined the word "eraser."  
1817: the first American school for the deaf opened in Hartford, Connecticut. 
1865: Andrew Johnson became the nation's 17th president upon Abraham Lincoln's death.
1878: Harley Proctor developed Ivory Soap. 
1892: the General Electric Company was incorporated. 
1896: the first Olympic games came to a close in Athens, Greece.   
1912: the "unsinkable" British luxury liner Titanic sank to the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean on its maiden voyage.  More than 15-hundred people were killed.  
1923: Insulin became available for general use in treating diabetes.  
1923: the first sound-on-film motion picture was demonstrated by Dr. Lee DeForest in New York City. 
1924: Rand McNally publishes its first road atlas.
1947: Jackie Robinson of the Brooklyn Dodgers broke the baseball color line when the team started him at first base on this date. 
1955: Ray Kroc opened the first McDonald's restaurant in Des Plaines, Illinois.  Hamburgers cost 15-cents, fries were 10-cents.  
1956: officials at General Motors announced the first, free piston automobile had been developed. 
1956: WNBQ in Chicago became the world's first all-color television station. 
1971: George C. Scott won a Best Actor Academy Award for his role in "Patton."  He refused the award saying it is degrading to have actors competing against each other. 
1980: French philosopher, playwright Jean-Paul Sartre died on this date at the age of 74.  Sartre was known as the Father of Existentialism. 
1983: "Flashdance" starring Jennifer Beals opened in theaters across the country.  
1985: South Africa said it would repeal laws prohibiting sex and marriage between whites and non-whites. 
1990: actress Greta Garbo died at the age of 84.  She starred in several films including "Mata Hari" and "Grand Hotel." 
1992: hotel owner Leona Helmsley entered prison to serve a four-year sentence for tax evasion. 
1996: the ashes of Grateful Dead lead singer Jerry Garcia were scattered on the waters beneath San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge. 
1996: funeral services were held for Jessica Dubroff  --  the seven-year-old girl who died while trying to become the youngest person to fly across America. 
1998: Pol Pot, the Khmer Rouge leader who presided over a reign of terror in Cambodia in the late 1970s, died at a jungle outpost near the Cambodian-Thailand border.  He was 73.  
1999: former "Baywatch" star Pamela Anderson Lee announced that she had her breast implants removed, saying she just wanted her body to go back to its natural state. 
2002: former NFL Running Back turned Supreme Court Justice Byron Raymond "Whizzer" White died on this date at the age of 84.  
2007: the late Jackie Robinson was honored by baseball teams across the U.S.  The day marked the 60th anniversary of Robinson breaking major league baseball's color barrier.  Robinson took the field for the first time on April 15th, 1947: against the Brooklyn Dodgers.    Many players wore jerseys bearing Robinson's number 42. 
2009: thousands of protestors marked the IRS filing deadline with tea-party rallies around the country.  They were objecting to government spending, ballooning deficits and bailouts.  
2012: Major League Baseball commemorated the 65th anniversary of Jackie Robinson breaking baseball's color barrier.  Every ballplayer, coach and manager wore Robinson's number 42 - the number he wore when he played for the Brooklyn Dodgers.  




HISTORY SPOTLIGHT

Jackie Robinson (Taken from Link

On this day in 1947, Jackie Robinson, age 28, becomes the first African-American player in Major League Baseball when he steps onto Ebbets Field in Brooklyn to compete for the Brooklyn Dodgers. Robinson broke the color barrier in a sport that had been segregated for more than 50 years. Exactly 50 years later, on April 15, 1997, Robinson's groundbreaking career was honored and his uniform number, 42, was retired from Major League Baseball by Commissioner Bud Selig in a ceremony attended by over 50,000 fans at New York City's Shea Stadium. Robinson's was the first-ever number retired by all teams in the league.



QUICK TRIVIA 

Ham Facts (Link)
Country Ham or Country-Style Ham - This is a dry-cured ham. The ham is hand rubbed with salt, sugar and nitrate; packed in the curing ingredients and usually smoked. A country ham is much drier than injected-cured hams and has a sharper flavored due to its high salt content. 
There are 13,564 people in the U.S. listed on whitepages.com with the last name 'Ham'
One of Noah's sons was named "Ham" 


WORD OF THE DAY 

mirth  [murth]  Show IPA
noun
1. gaiety or jollity, especially when accompanied by laughter
2. amusement or laughter

"Susan was encouraged to show mirth on this April 15th as she headed to the post office" 



INTRIGUING BIBLE FACT

After capturing Jerusalem, the pagan king, Nebuchadnezzar burned the temple and every important building 
So in the ninth year of Zedekiah's reign, on the tenth day of the tenth month, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon marched against Jerusalem with his whole army. He encamped outside the city and built siege works all around it.  The city was kept under siege until the eleventh year of King Zedekiah.  By the ninth day of the fourth month the famine in the city had become so severe that there was no food for the people to eat.  Then the city wall was broken through, and the whole army fled at night through the gate ....  He set fire to the temple of the LORD, the royal palace and all the houses of Jerusalem. Every important building he burned down.  The whole Babylonian army, under the commander of the imperial guard, broke down the walls around Jerusalem. (2 Kings 25:1-10)



WORD FROM THE WORD 

The judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether. . . . Sweeter also than honey and the honeycomb. —Psalm 19:9-10

Read today's "Our Daily Bread