Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Fun Facts and Daily Trivia for Thursday, February 11, 2016

Don't cry over spilled milk day
Fun Facts and Daily Trivia for Thursday, February 11, 2016
The 42 day of the year
324 days left to go 



THIS WEEK IS

  • Celebration of Love Week
  • Children of Alcoholics Week
  • Congenital Heart Defect Awareness Week
  • Have A Heart for A Chained Dog Week
  • Risk Awareness Week
  • Jell-O Week
  • Freelance Writers Appreciation Week
  • National Secondhand Wardrobe Week
  • Love Makes the World Go Round; But, Laughter Keeps Us From Getting Dizzy Week
  • American Camp Week



TODAY IS
  • Be Electrific Day
  • Don't Cry Over Spilled Milk Day 
  • Get Out Your Guitar Day
  • Make A Friend's Day 
  • Pro Sports Wives Day
  • National Shut-in Visitation Day
  • Satisfied Staying Single Day
  • White Shirt Day or White T-shirt Day  
  • World Day of The Sick 
  • National Make a Friend Day
  • National Peppermint Patty Day
  • National Inventors’ Day



ON THIS DATE...
1254: The British Parliament first convened.
1531:  King Henry VIII was recognized as supreme head of the Church of England.


1752: the first American hospital opened in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 


1777: Vermont abolished slavery. 
1790: the Religious Society of Friends presented a petition to Congress calling for the abolition of slavery. 
1808: Judge Jesse Fell experimented by burning anthracite coal to keep his house warm on this winter day in Wilkes-Barre, PA. He successfully showed how clean the coal burned and how cheaply it could be used as a heating fuel. As a result, that area of northeast Pennsylvania became an important coal mining area for generations. Those who settled in the area to work the coal mines were referred to as ‘coal crackers’ (Read more


1809: Robert Fulton patented the steamboat. 

1858: a French girl, Bernadette Soubirous, claimed to have seen a vision of the Virgin Mary near Lourdes, France for the first time. 


1892: Colorado's famous Pike's Peak was set aside as a forest reserve (learn more). 


1916: Emma Goldman was arrested for lecturing on birth control. 
1958: Ruth Carol Taylor became the first black female stewardess, working her first flight on  on Mohawk Airlines from Ithaca, New York to New York City on this date. 


1960: in one of television's most infamous moments, Jack Paar walked off the air at 11:41 pm on NBC's "Tonight Show."  Paar was apparently upset because one of his jokes, and about four minutes of airtime, had been cut by the network censors.  After predicting to the press that the show would crumble without him, a contrite Paar was back one month later (Read more)
1968: the new 20-thousand seat Madison Square Garden officially opened in New York City. It was the fourth arena to be named Madison Square Garden.  The showplace for sports and entertainment opened with a gala show hosted by Bob Hope and Bing Crosby. 


1974: America's motorists suffered through the worst day of the energy crisis.  Many gas stations were closed and the others often limited purchases to $3.00 per car.  Some reported customer lines up to six miles long. 

1975: Margaret Thatcher became the first woman to lead the British Conservative Party.


1982: ABC-TV's presentation of "The Winds of War" concluded.  The 18-hour mini-series cost $40 million to produce.  An estimated 40-Million people tuned in to watch one or more nights of the program. 

1995: the space shuttle Discovery landed at Cape Canaveral, Florida ending a historic rendezvous mission with Russia's Mir space station (Highlights). 


2006: adventurer Steve Fossett broke the world record for the longest continuous flight.  Fossett spent almost 77 straight hours flying in the specially-designed Virgin Atlantic Global Flyer before making an emergency landing at Bournemouth Airport in England.  The 61-year-old Fossett traveled 26-thousand-389 miles.  He was hoping to land in Kent, England, but was forced to land the plane after it developed electrical trouble.  


2006: Vice President Dick Cheney accidentally shot and wounded a 78-year-old man while hunting for quail on a ranch in Texas.  Cheney's hunting companion, Harry Whittington, owned the ranch where the weekend hunt took place. (bio)


2012: internationally beloved music superstar Whitney Houston was found dead in the bathroom of her room at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on this date. (Official website

2013: Pope Benedict the 16th announced his plans to resign his papacy at the end of the month citing health concerns.  In doing so the 85-year-old Pontiff became the first Pope to resign in nearly 600 years.  Vatican officials later confirmed that the Pope Benedict had had a heart procedure in late 2012.  The then-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger became Pope in April 2005 following the death of Pope John Paul the Second.  



HISTORY SPOTLIGHT

Nelson Mendela released from prison (Source)


Nelson Mandela, leader of the movement to end South African apartheid, is released from prison after 27 years on this day in 1990. 

In 1944, Mandela, a lawyer, joined the African National Congress (ANC), the oldest black political organization in South Africa, where he became a leader of Johannesburg's youth wing of the ANC. In 1952, he became deputy national president of the ANC, advocating nonviolent resistance to apartheid--South Africa's institutionalized system of white supremacy and racial segregation. However, after the massacre of peaceful black demonstrators at Sharpeville in 1960, Nelson helped organize a paramilitary branch of the ANC to engage in guerrilla warfare against the white minority government.

In 1961, he was arrested for treason, and although acquitted he was arrested again in 1962 for illegally leaving the country. Convicted and sentenced to five years at Robben Island Prison, he was put on trial again in 1964 on charges of sabotage. In June 1964, he was convicted along with several other ANC leaders and sentenced to life in prison.



QUICK TRIVIA

Peppermint Patty (Source)




This candy was invented by Henry C. Kessler in 1940 at his York Cone Company in York, Pennsylvania. It soon became so popular that the company quit making ice cream cones to concentrate on peppermint patties. So popular, indeed, that it later was bought by Hershey, who now make it.
There are a couple of unusual things about this candy.  First, the sugar content is distributed differently than in most chocolate candies. Much of the sugar is in the peppermint center, leaving the outer chocolate coating quite bittersweet - emphasis on bitter. 
And YPP has another distinction - what first set it apart from previous chocolate covered peppermint candies.  The peppermint center is firm rather than gooey.  Specifically, firm enough that it will break rather than bend. That makes it less of a messy-eating experience.  




WORD OF THE DAY


epistemology  [ih-pis-tuh-mol-uh-jee]

noun

a branch of philosophy that investigates the origin, nature, methods, and limits of human knowlege


"Marsha, who considered herself to be a lifelong learner, was excited to take a course on epistemology" 




INTRIGUING BIBLE FACT

While in Athens, Paul debated with some philosophers. 

"While Paul was waiting for them in Athens, he was greatly distressed to see that the city was full of idols. 17 So he reasoned in the synagogue with both Jews and God-fearing Greeks, as well as in the marketplace day by day with those who happened to be there. 18 A group of Epicurean and Stoic philosophers began to debate with him. Some of them asked, “What is this babbler trying to say?” Others remarked, “He seems to be advocating foreign gods.” They said this because Paul was preaching the good news about Jesus and the resurrection. 19 Then they took him and brought him to a meeting of the Areopagus, where they said to him, “May we know what this new teaching is that you are presenting? 20 You are bringing some strange ideas to our ears, and we would like to know what they mean” (Acts 17:16-20).



WORD FROM THE WORD 


Forgiving each other, just as in Christ God forgave you--Ephesians 4:32



Read today's "Our Daily Bread"  

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Fun Facts and Daily Trivia for Wednesday, February 10, 2016

National Umbrella Day
Fun Facts and Daily Trivia
Wednesday, February 10, 2016
The 41 day of the year
325 days left to go 


THIS WEEK IS
  • Celebration of Love Week
  • Children of Alcoholics Week
  • Congenital Heart Defect Awareness Week
  • Have A Heart for A Chained Dog Week
  • Risk Awareness Week
  • Jell-O Week
  • Freelance Writers Appreciation Week
  • National Secondhand Wardrobe Week
  • Love Makes the World Go Round; But, Laughter Keeps Us From Getting Dizzy Week
  • American Camp Week


TODAY IS
  • National Umbrella Day
  • Plimsoll Day
  • All The News That's Fit To Print Day
  • National Home Warranty Day
  • National Cream Cheese Brownie Day


ON THIS DATE...
1763: France ceded Canada to England under the Treaty of Paris, which ended the French and Indian War (also known as the Seven Years' War) (Read more).
1840: Britain's Queen Victoria married Prince Albert.


1846: Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Mormons, began an exodus to the west from Illinois.

1863: General Tom Thumb married fellow little person Lavinia Warren in New York City. 
1863: the fire extinguisher was patented by Alanson Crane. 
1870: the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) was founded in New York City. 


1897: "All the news that's fit to print" appeared on the front page of "The New York Times" beginning this day.


1933: the singing telegram was introduced by the Postal Telegraph Company of New York City (Sesame Street's Grover delivers singing telegram). 
1935: the Pennsylvania Railroad began passenger service with its new streamlined electric locomotive. 


1940: the Hanna-Barbera cartoon "Tom and Jerry" debuted (See Cartoon). 

1942: The first gold record (sprayed with gold by the record company RCA Victor) was presented to Glenn Miller for "Chattanooga Choo Choo."
1949: "Death of a Salesman" opened at the Morocco Theatre in New York City. 


1978: Van Halen released its debut album. 
1990: South African black nationalist leader Nelson Mandela was released from prison after 27 years. 

1992: heavyweight boxer Mike Tyson was found guilty of one count of rape and two counts of deviate sexual conduct.   
1994: five astronauts and one Russian cosmonaut returned to Earth aboard the space shuttle Discovery after the first joint United States-Russian space shuttle mission.   


1998: animal star Buddy The Wonder Dog died.  He starred in the film "Air Bud." 


2005: Britain's Royal family announced Prince Charles' plans to marry his longtime love Camilla Parker Bowles on April 8th, 2005.  Charles was previously married to Princess Diana who died in a Paris car crash 1997.  The couple had divorced prior to Diana's death. 
2005: after a week long hospital stay in Rome, Pope John Paul the Second was discharged from the hospital.  The Pope was rushed to the hospital a week earlier with acute breathing problems related to the flu. 


2007: Illinois Senator Barack Obama officially entered the race for the White House in Springfield, Ilinois. Thousands of people turned out in freezing temperatures to see Obama declare his candidacy for President of the United States.  

2013: Mumford & Sons' "Babel" was named Album of the Year at the 55th Annual Grammy Awards.  




HISTORY SPOTLIGHT 

Computer Defeats Chess Champion (Source)


On February 10, 1996, Deep Blue became the first computer to win a chess game against a reigning world chess champion, Gary Kasparov. Chess matches include several individual games, however, and Kasparov went on to win three (and tie two) of the next five games.




QUICK TRIVIA 

Singing telegrams (Source)


A singing telegram is a message that is delivered by an artist in a musical form. Singing telegrams are historically linked to normal telegrams, but tend to be humorous. Sometimes the artist is in costume or formal clothing. Singing telegrams are often given as a gift. Western Union, the American telegraph company began offering singing telegram services on this date in 1933. As relatively few telegram recipients had telephones, most telegrams, including singing telegrams, were first delivered in person. 



WORD OF THE DAY

Nebulous  [neb-yuh-luhs]  –adjective 



hazy, vague, indistinct:


"In order to be a meteorologist, there are times when you need to be somewhat nebulous"



INTRIGUING BIBLE FACT

In the beginning, man spoke one language; however, because of man's sin and pride, God confused man's launguage. 

"Now the whole world had one language and a common speech. As people moved eastward, they found a plain in Shinar and settled there.They said to each other, “Come, let’s make bricks and bake them thoroughly.” They used brick instead of stone, and tar for mortar. Then they said, “Come, let us build ourselves a city, with a tower that reaches to the heavens, so that we may make a name for ourselves; otherwise we will be scattered over the face of the whole earth.” But the Lord came down to see the city and the tower the people were building. The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” So the Lord scattered them from there over all the earth, and they stopped building the city. That is why it was called Babel—because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth." (Genesis 11:1-9)


WORD FROM THE WORD 

He is before all things--Colossians 1:17


Read today's "Our Daily Bread"  

Monday, February 8, 2016

Fun Facts and Daily Trivia for Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Fun Facts and Daily Trivia
Tuesday, February 9, 2016
The 40 day of the year
326 days left to go 



THIS WEEK IS
  • Celebration of Love Week
  • Children of Alcoholics Week
  • Congenital Heart Defect Awareness Week
  • Have A Heart for A Chained Dog Week
  • Risk Awareness Week
  • Jell-O Week
  • Freelance Writers Appreciation Week
  • National Secondhand Wardrobe Week
  • Love Makes the World Go Round; But, Laughter Keeps Us From Getting Dizzy Week
  • American Camp Week

TODAY IS

  • Mardi Gras (Link)
  • National Stop Bullying Day (Link)
  • National Pizza Day 
  • Paczki Day
  • Read in the Bathtub Day
  • Safer Internet Day
  • Toothache Day 
  • Extraterrestrial Culture Day
  • Extraterrestrial Visitor Day 
  • International Pancake Day
  • National Bagel Day (Formerly Bagel and Lox Day)



ON THIS DATE...


1825: The U.S. House of Representatives elected John Quincy Adams the 6th President after no candidate received a majority of electoral votes. He had won fewer votes than Andrew Jackson in the popular election. (Read more)

1870: the United States Weather Bureau was authorized by Congress.  The organization is now known as the National Weather Service. 
1895: the first college basketball game was played.  Minnesota State School of Agriculture defeated Hamline College nine-to-three. 
1942: Congress pushes ahead standard time for the United States by one hour in each time zone, imposing daylight saving time--called at the time "war time." (See History Spotlight) 


1950: Senator Joseph McCarthy claimed the State Department was filled with Communists. 



1951: actress Greta Garbo was granted U.S. citizenship. 
1963: the first Boeing 727 took off.  The 727 quickly became the world's most popular way to fly. 


1964: more than 73-million people tuned in to see The Beatles make an appearance on "The Ed Sullivan Show."  It was the U.S. television debut of the "Fab Four."  More than 50-thousand requests were sent for the 750 available seats at the show (Read and watch). 



1964: the "G-I Joe" action figure made its debut. (Brief history)



1969: the Boeing 747 made its inaugural flight.  It was the world's first jumbo jet. 


1971: the Apollo 14 spacecraft returned to Earth.  (Video)



1987: 20 years after the first woman was admitted to the New York Stock Exchange, the Exchange Luncheon Club installed a women's restroom. 
1992: Los Angeles Lakers guard Magic Johnson came out of retirement to play in the NBA All-Star Game.  He wound up winning the game's most valuable player award. 
1994: Nelson Mandela became the first black president of South Africa. 


1997: the 167th episode of "The Simpsons" aired on the Fox television network, making it the longest-running animated series in history.  The show topped "The Flintstones," which aired 166 episodes over a six-year period. 


1999: the Rev. Jerry Falwell suggested that "Tinky Winky," one of the characters on the popular children's TV show "Teletubbies," was gay. 
2001: An American submarine accidentally strikes and sinks a Japanese fishing vessel off the coast of Hawaii, killing nine.


2009: baseball star Alex Rodriguez admitted to using performance enhancing drugs between 2001 and 2003. 


2014: in celebration of the 50th anniversary of The Beatles' first appearance on "The Ed Sullivan Show," CBS aired the star-studded special "The Night That Changed America: Grammy Salute to the Beatles," which featured performances from surviving Beatles Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr, among others. 



HISTORY SPOTLIGHT 

Daylight Saving Time (Source


Although standard time in time zones was instituted in the U.S. and Canada by the railroads in 1883, it was not established in U.S. law until the Act of March 19, 1918, sometimes called the Standard Time Act. The act also established daylight saving time, a contentious idea then. Daylight saving time was repealed in 1919, but standard time in time zones remained in law. Daylight time became a local matter. It was re-established nationally early in World War II, and was continuously observed from 9 February 1942 to 30 September 1945. After the war its use varied among states and localities. The Uniform Time Act of 1966 provided standardization in the dates of beginning and end of daylight time in the U.S. but allowed for local exemptions from its observance. The act provided that daylight time begin on the last Sunday in April and end on the last Sunday in October, with the changeover to occur at 2 a.m. local time.



QUICK TRIVIA 


Sixty-three percent of people read books, magazines, and newspapers while in the bathroom. Men and people age 34 or younger are significantly more likely to read in the bathroom than other demographics  (Source)




WORD FOR THE DAY 


thingamajig  [thing-uh-muh-jig] 

noun, Informal.

1. a gadget or other thing for which the speaker does not know or has forgotten the name.


"Marsha, trying to point the exploding bottle away from her face, saturated in Mountain Dew, screamed out to her friend to hand her the thingamajig."



INTRIGUING BIBLE FACT


Although Jeremiah was the actual "author", he dictated his material to Baruch. 

"Then Jeremiah called Baruch the son of Neriah, and Baruch wrote on a scroll at the dictation of Jeremiah all the words of the Lord that he had spoken to him.  And Jeremiah ordered Baruch, saying, “I am banned from going to the house of the Lord, so you are to go, and on a day of fasting in the hearing of all the people in the Lord’s house you shall read the words of the Lord from the scroll that you have written at my dictation. You shall read them also in the hearing of all the men of Judah who come out of their cities" (‭Jeremiah‬ ‭36‬:‭4-6‬ ESV).


"The word that Jeremiah the prophet spoke to Baruch the son of Neriah, when he wrote these words in a book at the dictation of Jeremiah, in the fourth year of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah, king of Judah" (‭Jeremiah‬ ‭45‬:‭1‬ ESV). 



WORD FROM THE WORD 


A man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and they shall become one flesh. — Genesis 2:24


Read today's "Our Daily Bread"