Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Fun Facts for Thursday, October 23, 2014

Fun Facts for Thursday, October 23, 2014
The 296 day of the year
69 days left in the year




THIS WEEK IS 

  • Bullying Bystanders Unite Week
  • International Infection Prevention Week
  • National Character Counts Week
  • National Chemistry Week
  • National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week
  • National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week
  • National Massage Therapy Week
  • National Respiratory Care Week
  • National Save For Retirement Week
  • Pastoral Care Week



TODAY IS

  • Diwali 
  • IPod Day 
  • National Mole Day (Link)
  • National Pharmacy Technician Day 
  • Swallows Depart from San Juan Capistrano Day 
  • TV Talk Show Host Day  
  • National Canning Day   
  • National Boston Cream Pie Day




ON THIS DATE...


1910: Blanche S. Scott became the first woman aviator. Blanche was known, not as an aviator, but an aviatrix. She soared to an altitude of 12 feet over Ft. Wayne, Indiana.
1915: 25-thousand women marched in New York City demanding the right to vote. 

1915: The first U.S. championship horseshoe tourney was held in Kellerton, IA. 
1930: J.K. Scott won the first miniature golf tournament. The event was held in Chattanooga, TN


1941: Walt Disney's animated classic "Dumbo" was released in theaters across the U.S.. 

1956: Jonathan Winters became a TV star. Winters was seen coast to coast in the first videotape recording to be broadcast. The tape originated from WRCA-TV in New York City. The broadcast was developed for NBC network stations.


1962: 12-year-old Steveland Morris Judkins recorded his first single, "Thank You for Loving Me All the Way," for Motown Records.  He later became known a Little Stevie Wonder. 

1964: the United States basketball team won the gold medal at the Olympic games in Tokyo, Japan.  
1973: President Richard Nixon agreed to turn over White House tape recordings to Watergate judge John Sirica. 
1976: Chicago topped the charts with "If You Leave Me Now." 
1979: Monty Python's "Life of Brian" opened in theatres across the U.S.. 
1983: 237 U.S. Marines stationed in Lebanon were killed when a suicide truck bomber crashed into the U.S. compound at Beirut International Airport. 
1989: Hungary became an independent republic, after 33 years of Soviet rule.


1991:  Clarence Thomas was  sworn in as the nation's 106th Supreme Court Justice. 
1998: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat signed a breakthrough land-for-peace agreement at the White House. 
2000: Universal Studios Consumer Products Group (USCPG) and Amblin Entertainment announced an unprecedented and exclusive three-year worldwide merchandising program with Toys "R" Us, Inc. The deal was for the rights to exclusive "E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial" merchandise starting in fall 2001. The film was scheduled for re-release in the spring of 2002. 


2004: pop singer Ashlee Simpson created a media buzz after a performance on NBC's "Saturday Night Live" when it was revealed during a musical miscue that she was using a pre-recorded vocal track in her supposed live performance.  Simpson later said she had to use guided vocals to lip-sync the performance because she had lost her voice that day. 



HISTORY SPOTLIGHT

Chicago's first number one hit: "If You Leave Me Now" (Source and Song


Chicago's bass player, Peter Cetera, wrote the song and sang lead. After it became a huge hit, the band became known for its ballads that featured Cetera's vocals and de-emphasized the horn section. In the UK, this was Chicago's only #1 hit. This was also the first Chicago single to feature an acoustic guitar lead.


QUICK TRIVIA

National Mole Day (Taken from Link


Celebrated annually on October 23 from 6:02 a.m. to 6:02 p.m., Mole Day commemorates Avogadro's Number (6.02 x 1023), which is a basic measuring unit in chemistry. Mole Day was created as a way to foster interest in chemistry. Schools throughout the United States and around the world celebrate Mole Day with various activities related to chemistry and/or moles.



WORD FOR THE DAY

Vernacular  [ver-nak-yuh-ler]   adjective


1. native or indigenous (opposed to literary or learned ).
2. expressed or written in the native language of a place, as literary works.

"Missy had never been to Sunday School before and, although she enjoyed the donuts, she was unfamiliar with the vernacular. "



INTRIGUING BIBLE FACT 
Paul made a specific reference to a ship that took him to Rome. 

"After three months we put out to sea in a ship that had wintered in the island—it was an Alexandrian ship with the figurehead of the twin gods Castor and Pollux" (Acts 28:11).



WORD FROM THE WORD

Search me, O God, and know my heart. —Psalm 13923







Read today's "Our Daily Bread"    

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Fun Facts for Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Fun Facts for Wednesday, October 22, 2014
The 295 day of the year
70 days left in the year


THIS WEEK IS 

  • Bullying Bystanders Unite Week
  • International Infection Prevention Week
  • National Character Counts Week
  • National Chemistry Week
  • National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week
  • National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week
  • National Massage Therapy Week
  • National Respiratory Care Week
  • National Save For Retirement Week
  • Pastoral Care Week



TODAY IS

  • Caps Locks Day 
  • International Stuttering Awareness Day 
  • Medical Assistants Recognition Day 
  • National Nut Day 
  • Smart is Cool Day 
  • National Color Day 



ON THIS DATE...
1746: Princeton University in New Jersey received its charter.
1797: French balloonist Andre-Jacques Garnerin made the first parachute jump. It was made from a hot air balloon 2,300 feet above Paris.
1836: Sam Houston was inaugurated as the first constitutionally elected president of the Republic of Texas.


1844: On this day, according to those who practiced Millerism, the world was to come to an end. A man named William Miller, religious leader and founder of the Adventist church, started the Millerism movement. Some say his followers got rid of all their earthly possessions and climbed to high places so as to be saved when the world ended.
1883: the original Metropolitan Opera House opened in New York City. 
1907: Ringling Brothers bought out their rival, Barnum and Bailey circus, to form the most famous circus in the world. 
1918: The Great Influenza Epidemic began; it was a worldwide epidemic that would eventually claim 18 million lives.
1934: notorious bank robber "Pretty Boy" Floyd was shot and killed by federal agents in East Liverpool, Ohio.  
1938: Chester Carlson demonstrated the first copying machine.  


1960: boxer Cassius Clay, the future Muhammad Ali, won his first professional fight. 

1962: President Kennedy announced an air and naval blockade of Cuba, following the discovery of Soviet missile bases on the island.  
1964: EMI Records passed on a chance to sign the band High Numbers following their audition.  The group later became The Who. 
1969: Paul McCartney officially denied the rumor that he was dead. 


1982: Sylvester Stallone's first Rambo film, "First Blood," opened across the U.S. 
1978: Pope John Paul the Second was installed as the pontiff of the Roman Catholic Church, in effect becoming the first non-Italian Pope in 456 years. 

1979: the 100-millionth person passed through the gates of Florida's Walt Disney World. 
1991: the first Planet Hollywood restaurant opened in New York City. 


1998: the government announced one of the biggest toy recalls ever.  Parents were told to remove batteries from their children's Fisher Price "Power Wheels" cars and trucks because of faulty wiring that could cause the toys to burst into flames.  (Power Wheels Commercial)
2001: tennis power couple Andre Agassi and Steffi Graf were married in a private ceremony by a Las Vegas judge. 





HISTORY SPOTLIGHT

On this day in 1969, Beetle, Paul McCartney officially denied the rumor that he was dead (Taken from Link


In the Fall of 1969 a rumor swept around the world alleging that Paul McCartney, singer and bassist for the Beatles, was dead. In fact, that he had died three years ago on November 9, 1966 in a fiery car crash while heading home from the EMI recording studios. Supposedly the surviving band members, fearful of the effect his death might have on their careers, secretly replaced him with a double named William Campbell (an orphan who had won a Paul McCartney lookalike contest in Edinburgh). However, they also planted clues in their later albums to let fans know the truth, that Paul was dead.

Beatles fans, who came to be known as "cluesters," spent countless hours searching for clues hidden in the albums, eventually locating hundreds of them. Numerous articles appeared in magazines pondering the likelihood of Paul's Death. John Chancellor even discussed the issue on the NBC evening news, concluding that "All we can report with certainty is that Paul McCartney is either dead or alive." McCartney only inflamed the rumor by refusing to appear in public to deny it. Finally photographers for LIFE Magazine tracked the singer down to his Mull of Kintyre country house where he was on vacation and took a photo of him which it ran on its cover, thereby throwing some cold water on the rumor. But not killing it entirely. To this day a few diehard cluesters still persist in their belief that McCartney died in 1966. It is the most persistent and elaborate false death rumor in history.



QUICK TRIVIA

The Influenza Pandemic of 1918 (Taken from Link


The influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 killed more people than World War I (WWI)-- somewhere between 20 and 40 million people. It has been cited as the most devastating epidemic in recorded world history. More people died of influenza in a single year than in four-years of the Black Death Bubonic Plague from 1347 to 1351. Known as "Spanish Flu" or "La Grippe" the influenza of 1918-1919 was a global disaster.


WORD FOR THE DAY

Ennoble  [en-noh-buhl]  


verb (used with object), en·no·bled, en·no·bling.
1. to elevate in degree, excellence, or respect; dignify; exalt: a personality ennobled by true generosity.
2. to confer a title of nobility on.

"After the football game, Jim ennobled Joey to the rank of best friend"


INTRIGUING BIBLE FACT 
Gideon would not allow the Israelites to make him their ruler. 

The Israelites said to Gideon, “Rule over us—you, your son and your grandson—because you have saved us from the hand of Midian.” 23 But Gideon told them, “I will not rule over you, nor will my son rule over you. The Lord will rule over you.” 24 And he said, “I do have one request, that each of you give me an earring from your share of the plunder.” (It was the custom of the Ishmaelites to wear gold earrings.) 25 They answered, “We’ll be glad to give them.” So they spread out a garment, and each of them threw a ring from his plunder onto it. 26 The weight of the gold rings he asked for came to seventeen hundred shekels, not counting the ornaments, the pendants and the purple garments worn by the kings of Midian or the chains that were on their camels’ necks. 27 Gideon made the gold into an ephod, which he placed in Ophrah, his town. All Israel prostituted themselves by worshiping it there, and it became a snare to Gideon and his family.  (Judges 8:22-27)


WORD FROM THE WORD


The Lord searches all hearts and understands all the intent of the thoughts. —1 Chronicles 289

Read today's "Our Daily Bread"    

Monday, October 20, 2014

Fun Facts for Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Fun Facts for Tuesday, October 21, 2014
The 294 day of the year
71 days left in the year



THIS WEEK IS 

  • Bullying Bystanders Unite Week
  • International Infection Prevention Week
  • National Character Counts Week
  • National Chemistry Week
  • National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week
  • National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week
  • National Massage Therapy Week
  • National Respiratory Care Week
  • National Save For Retirement Week
  • Pastoral Care Week



TODAY IS

  • Celebration of The Mind Day 
  • Global Iodine Deficiency Disorder (IDD) Prevention Day 
  • Pro-Life Day of Silent Solidarity 
  • Reptile Awareness Day 
  • National Pumpkin Cheesecake Day




ON THIS DATE...
1774: First display of the word "Liberty" on a flag, raised by colonists in Taunton, Massachusetts in defiance of British rule in Colonial America.
1797: the warship "Constitution" was launched in Boston Harbor.  Following a battle with the British warship "Guerriere," the "Constitution" was given the nickname "Old Ironsides." 


1879: Thomas Edison invented a workable electric light. 


1913: Camel cigarettes were first introduced. 
1917: soldiers from the U.S. Army's First Division became the first American soldiers to do battle in World War One.  The troops dug in to their trenches near Nancy, France. 


1918: Margaret Owen set a typing speed record of 170 words per minute on a manual typewriter. 


1922: the Sweetest Day tradition was started by candy company employee Herbert Birch Kingston. 
1925: The U.S. Treasury Department announced that it had fined 29,620 people for (alcohol) prohibition violations. The fines totaled $5,000,000.


1957: Johnny Mathis topped the charts with "Chances Are." 


1958: Orchestral strings were used for the first time in a rock and roll tune. Buddy Holly recorded It Doesn’t Matter Anymore, written by Paul Anka. Sadly, it would be Holly’s last studio session. The song wasn’t released until after his death in February of 1959.
1959: the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum opened in New York City. 
1960: John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon squared off in their fourth and final televised presidential debate. 
1961: Bob Dylan recorded his first album for Columbia Records.  
1975: Elton John received a star on the Hollywood Walk-of-Fame. 


1976: the Cincinnati Reds "Big Red Machine" won their second straight World Series with a sweep of the New York Yankees. 




1985: William ‘The Refrigerator’ Perry of the Chicago Bears led his team to a 23-7 win over the Green Bay Packers. Perry, weighing in at 325 pounds (more than some Frigidaires), became a folk hero as he cut a path for Walter Payton’s two TDs. He then plodded over the goal line himself for another score.

1989: Peter Bynoe and Bertram Lee became the first black owners of a major sports team, purchasing the Denver Nuggets for $65 Million.  
1992: New York protesters upset with Sinead O'Connor for ripping up a photo of pope on "Saturday Night Live" used a steamroller to crush dozens of the Irish singer's CDs, records and tapes. 
2004: Cuban leader Fidel Castro took a spill during a graduation ceremony in Havana Cuba, shattering his knee in eight pieces.  Doctors rebuilt Castro's knee cap in a three hour operation. 



HISTORY SPOTLIGHT

Thomas Edison invents the workable electric light bulb (Taken from Link



On Oct. 21, 1879, Thomas Edison devised a workable electric light at his laboratory in Menlo Park, N.J. A New York Times reporter visited Edison there and wrote an article about it that appeared in the paper on Dec. 28, 1879. “The lamp which Mr. Edison regards as a crowning triumph is a model of simplicity and economy,” he said.

Edison’s light bulb was one great achievement in his a brilliant career. Known as the “Wizard of Menlo Park,” Edison received more than 1,000 patents for his work and created or improved upon items like the phonograph, the motion picture camera and a battery for vehicles.



QUICK TRIVIA

Carlton Fish homer in game 6 (See the video)


On October 21, 1975, Boston Red Sox catcher Carlton Fisk hits a homer off the left-field pole to beat the Cincinnati Reds in the sixth game of the World Series. The Sox went on to lose the championship, of course. Still, even 30 years later, the films and photos of Fisk urgently trying to wave the ball into fair territory provide some of the game’s most enduring and exciting images. As team president Larry Lucchino pointed out, "the appeal of baseball at its best was illustrated that night."


WORD FOR THE DAY


Redolent  (red-l-uhnt)
having a pleasant odor; fragrant.
odorous or smelling (usually fol. by of)

"After a full day of sweaty soccer, Sarah was dirty and smell; however, with the help of some warm water and Mr. Bubble, Sarah returned to her clean, redolent self"



INTRIGUING BIBLE FACT 

At Jesus' baptism, the Holy Spirit descended upon Him as a dove

"Then John gave this testimony: "I saw the Spirit come down from heaven as a dove and remain on him" (John 1:32)


WORD FROM THE WORD


I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners, to repentance. —Luke 5:32


Read today's "Our Daily Bread"